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Farmers in South Africa are being murdered at the rate of 313/100,000, and they often suffer violent deaths after being tortured for hours.
That's 2 farmers every week! 90% of farms that have been redistributed have failed and are NOT producing any food. Farm killings have increased since Julius Malema - leader of the ANC Youth League - has started singing the banned song "Kill the Boer, Kill the Farmer".

 

Where’s the anti-White news media on this human tragedy?


Farmers' wives learn how to defend themselves on a farm-attack prevention course near the Zimbabwean border

 
Farmers learn rural survival techniques on the farm-attack prevention courses
 
Die nuwe Suid-Afrika  
Whites are being purposefully targeted and viciously murdered in South Africa as the world is kept in the dark by the diversity brainwashing, anti-White media. I guess it's not Darfur, huh? When will YOU get the deal?  Where’s the anti-White news media on this human tragedy?   
Save the White people of South Africa!Stop the Genocide of thousands of our people.  
Boycott the South African Government for the Genocide against White people.
If the world could boycott
South Africa for having separate racial development, should it not boycott the South African Government for the Genocide going on against White people in that country today?
 

By May 2003 Anti-hijacking Task Teams were operational in each of the seven police aeras in Gauteng:                                                                 

  • Pretoria
  • Johannesburg
  • Soweto                                                                 
  • West Rand
  • Vaal Rand
  • East Rand
  • North Rand
 

 

 
 


ANTI HIJACK PROJECT LAUNCHED BY BUSINESS COMMUNITY

As part of their commitment to road safety and making communities safer, short-term insurer OUTsurance has teamed up with the SAPS, Business Against Crime and Beeld in an initiative called the Anti-hijacking Project. Aimed at awarding highly success teams and individual members of anti-hijacking teams, the Project is set to improve morale and motivate participants to greater heights of performance.

2002 SAPS statistics reflected a grim picture: 15 291 hijackings of vehicles were reported countrywide, of which 9054 (62%) took place in Gauteng. In January 2003, during a meeting with Dr Graham Wright of Business Against Crime South Africa and the Gauteng Provincial Commissioner of Police, Commissioner Naidoo, the question was raised what could be done to reduce the hijackings in the province by 20%. The result was the Anti-hijacking Project. Report a Crime   

The teams have been suitably staffed and equipped and are currently manned by approximately 250 full-time police members. Their mandate was to reduce the high levels of hijacking in the province, which they have fulfilled exceptionally well. Reported incidents of hijackings in the province have been reduced by 32% over the past year.

In an attempt to recognise this outstanding performance, by both teams and individual members, Provincial Commissioner, Commissioner Naidoo, identified the need for a formal awards and recognition process. Against this background, he requested Business Against Crime to find a sponsor, which is where OUTsurance entered the picture.

The concept works as follows: OUTsurance provides exclusive sponsorship for the Best SAPS Gauteng Anti-hijacking Team member, which will be handed out monthly. The award for the Best SAPS Gauteng Anti-hijacking Team will be handed out on a quarterly basis.

An evaluation committee has been appointed to select the winners according to criteria ranging from the reduction in the number of reported hijackings to the number of firearms confiscated (for teams); from the identification of vehicle crime related syndicates to the number of unscheduled and unremunerated after hours duties performed (for individual members).

The following statistics resulted in the East Rand being appointed as winning team for the period May 2003 to April 2004:

 
 
 
  • Suspects arrested: 127
  • Vehicles recovered: 270
  • Firearms recovered: 40

This has led not only to an increased number of hijacking cases on the court rolls, but to a total reduction of 41% in reported hijacking in the East Rand region.



 

 
award certificate and an R1500 shopping voucher from Shoprite Checkers for his outstanding performance on the crime intelligence front, while his commanding officer, Supt Barry Britz, received a R500 shopping voucher. Regarding his work, Insp Sokhela says, “I like crime intelligence, because you are in the background. I’m actually a very shy guy.”

 
Vet's son Barend Harris, 13, learns to shoot

 

 
Farmer's wife Ida Nel learns how shoot an AK-47 and a pistol  
The winner in the individual category, and also a member of the East Rand Team, is Insp.Soks Sokhela. He received an  

 

  CRITERIA FOR BEST TEAM AWARD 

As a result of the complexities around combating hijackings it has been decided that the most effective team efforts will be measured on a combination of :

  • Reduction in the number of reported hijackings based on the previous months figure and compared to the same month of the previous year
  • The number of vehicle crime related arrests made
  • Number of vehicle crime related arrested suspects charged on the CAS
  • Number of vehicle crime related arrested suspects charged in court
  • Number of suspects convicted
  • Number of years imprisonment obtained in court for each person convicted
  • Number of vehicles confiscated and positively identified by owners; and
  • Number of second-hand dealers operating without a valid certificate in terms of the Second –hand Goods Act (Act No 23 of 1955) closed down
  • Number of firearms confiscated during the period




 
 
CRITERIA FOR THE BEST INDIVIDUAL MEMBER AWARD

Task teams follow a multi skilled approach and apply different disciplines in their each unique way. The criteria for outstanding performance have thus been separated as follows:

 

Crime Intelligence Gathering

 

Identification of vehicle crime related syndicates or syndicate members Identification of receivers of stolen and hijacked vehicles

Identification of offset areas for stolen and hijacked vehicles Linkages of suspects arrested with other outstanding cases

Number of informer claims submitted Number of unscheduled and unremunerated after hours duties performed.



 
     

 
Detectives

Level of crime scene handling(output = linking suspects with evidence recovered at the crime scene) Number of vehicle related suspects arrested by the individual member ( tracing of suspect included) [Suspect must be charged on CAS and in court] Number of suspects arrested from AVIS list Number of stolen and hijacked vehicles positively identified as such Number of cases in which bail was successfully opposed Number of convictions Number of years imprisonment obtained Number of informer claims submitted Number of unscheduled and unremunerated after hours duties performed.
   
Number of stolen and hijacked vehicles recovered
Firearms recovered
Number of vehicle crime related arrests charged on CAS and in court

 Crime Prevention / Rapid Response Teams
 
 
 
 

Introduction and Background

Technology has changed the way people communicate and do business with each other. Tracking technology has evolved from the developments in personal computers, mobile phones, the GPS Global Positioning System and the Internet into what is now described as “vehicle telematics”.

In this section we would like to focus on vehicle tracking as the “use of computers and telecommunications to enhance the functionality, productivity and security of both vehicles and drivers”. This can also be described as the technology of tracking the movements and/or status of a vehicle or fleet of vehicles, through the use of a vehicle tracking device, typically equipped with a GPS Locator and GPRS modem, which is fitted in the vehicle. 

What do I need to know about Vehicle Tracking?

A vehicle tracking system is basically an electronic device installed in a vehicle to enable the owner or a third party to track the vehicle's location. Most modern vehicle tracking systems use Global Positioning System (GPS) modules for accurate location of the vehicle. Many systems also combine a communications component such as cellular or satellite transmitters to communicate the vehicle’s location to a remote user. Vehicle information can be viewed on electronic maps via the Internet or specialized software.

 

Typical vehicle tracking systems are comprised of two core parts; location hardware (or tracking device) and vehicle tracking software. The tracking device is most often hardware installed in the vehicle; connected to the ignition switch, battery and antennae. The typical tracking hardware for a fleet management solution uses GPS to pinpoint its location and then updates are transmitted at a regular timed interval or after an event trigger, e.g. ignition on / off.  The location data is made available for viewing through many of the solutions sold today, via a website, accessed over the internet, where fleet activity can be viewed live or historically using digital maps and reports.

Vehicle Tracking and Road Safety
   
"Passive" devices store GPS location, speed, heading and sometimes a trigger event such as key on/off, door open/closed. Once the vehicle returns to a predetermined point, the device is removed and the data downloaded to a computer for evaluation. 

  • "Active" devices also collect the same information but usually transmit the data in real-time via cellular or satellite networks to a computer or data centre for evaluation.

Hijacking of vehicles reached its lowest point at 02h00 in the morning.  Hijackings are low during the night and early hours of the morning, and start increasing at 06h00 due to motorists leaving home for work and stabilises throughout the day.

A drastic increase occurred from 17h00 in the afternoon due to motorists heading towards home.  Vehicles hijacked during this peak hour (16h00 – 20h00) may be explained by the fact that people returning from work are often tired, frustrated and not alert to potentially threatening circumstances.  Negligence on behalf of the motorist could also not be excluded, e.g. an idling vehicle is left unattended to open a gate in the driveway.  This trend is not new and the motorist will become the prey of hijackers.

Another explanation for this phenomenon is that highways are congested with traffic, which make it almost impossible to catch hijackers involved without air support once they have disappeared into traffic.

   

 Weapons used during hijackings:As it was earlier indicated, in the majority of vehicle hijackings, firearms were used to commit the crime.  Gauteng and Kwa-Zulu Natal reported the highest incidence of vehicle hijacking.  The circulation of illegal firearms in South Africa is disturbing and has to have a direct influence on the increase of vehicle hijackings and violent crime in general in South Africa.

The trade in stolen firearms is a lucrative industry in South Africa and the rewards seem to justify the risk of apprehension for the criminals involved.  The punishment of crimes does not seem to have a deterrent effect on potential criminals anymore.

The analysis indicates that firearms most used are pistols and revolvers.  A very small percentage of vehicle hijackings are committed using knifes, hands, high caliber guns and shotguns.

   

 When to Shoot:It is noticed with great concern that there is general confusion over the issue of the public shooting and killing or wounding another person under differing circumstances.  People have a responsibility to protect themselves in a situation where they need to discharge a firearm in the process of self-protection.

 

What exactly are the legal requirements of self-defense?

  • The following points are important:
  • The attack must be unlawful.
  • The attack must be imminent or have commenced.  The attack must not have been completed. 
  • One cannot act on grounds of self-defense for an attack committed an hour earlier.
  • The defensive action must be directed against the attacker.
  • The defensive action must be proportionate to the circumstances. 
  • The value of property involved and the instrument used for attack are important considerations.
  • The test used by the court to determine the lawfulness of the defensive action is that of a reasonable man.
  • The question to be asked is whether a reasonable man in the same position would have done the same thing. 

In all cases where a person is killed, the matter is investigated to establish if anyone was responsible for the death.  This is the point when people perceive they are being charged with murder by the police and believe they cannot defend themselves against an unlawful attack without being charged.  If your action is within the principles of self-defense, there is nothing to worry about.

   

 Types of hijackings:

 

Freight Hijacking 
A commercial vehicle is hijacked not only to secure the vehicle but also its cargo, which can be of substantial value.  Frequently, the cargo is of more interest to the hijacker than the truck.

 Transport Hijacking 
The vehicle is taken for the express purpose of using it as transport during other crimes such as drug dealing, burglaries, bank robberies and gun running.  The vehicles are probably later cannibalised for spare parts or simply dumped.

 Showmanship Hijacking 
A gang operates out of egotistical bravado, acting on the “this is a cool thing to be doing” rationale.  Peer group pressure is very high and individuals may be coerced into more dangerous and daredevil approaches; being labeled a “sissy” if they don’t.  Thus intimidation, violence and vandalism are associated with the crime.  Drugs and alcohol may also be a motive as theft of the victim’s personal belongings is commonplace.

 Operational Hijacking 
A group formally work together in a more structured way.  They usually have experience in car theft and have established contacts within the motorcar underworld that will receive and pay cash for stolen vehicles or spare parts.

 Syndicate Hijacking 
The most organised of all and often has international connections.  A network of hijacking groups is established with the overall coordinator, syndicating out work so that he remains out of view in exactly the same way as the drug baron uses pushers.  This makes identifying and arresting the ultimate boss
very difficult.  Additionally, a syndicate is often backed by a lot of money, especially if there are international links and makes full use of any potential to bribe the authorities in order to protect their operations.

   

Modus Operandi used by the hijackers:

 

  • Most hijackings take place in the driveways of residential areas. 
  • These hijackers prefer areas with accessible escape routes.
  • Hijackings take place while stationed at any traffic sign or intersection.
  • Hijackings take place while stationary next to the road, e.g. to answer cell phone.
  • Hijackings also occur at post offices and parking areas or you may be followed leaving the filling station with
  • the objective to hijack your vehicle where it is quiet.
  • The hijackers sometimes use a vehicle to force the victim off the road.
  • Hijackings take place at schools when dropping off / picking up children.
  • Hijackings take place while the vehicle is idling when off-loading / loading passengers.
  • Hijackings take place when advertising your vehicle for sale (Test drive method).
  • Bogus Police or Traffic Officers also conduct hijackings (Blue light scenario). 
   

 HOW TO AVOID A HIJACK SITUATION:

 

Approaching and entering your driveway:

2km from your house strategy.  Be extra alert.  Switch off the car radio and concentrate on your surroundings.  If you have noticed any vehicle behind you, use the techniques you have learned during the hijack prevention & survival course to determine whether you are being followed. 

Remember to stop your vehicle just on the inside of the gate and select reverse whilst waiting for the gate to close.  This creates confusion and may buy you a few seconds for the gate to close completely behind you.


Check your driveway and street before you leave or enter your premises.

Make sure your driveway is well lit and clear from shrubbery where perpetrators can hide.
Be aware of unknown pedestrians close to your residential address – do not turn into your driveway – pass and go back later.
Liaise with your neighbours – know them.
Be aware of vehicles parked close to your address with occupants inside.  It might be perpetrators observing the area.
Be alert if your animals do not greet you at the gate as usual.  It might be that the perpetrators over-powered them.
Phone your home and ask for someone to make sure your driveway is safe and to open and close the gate for you.
When returning home after dark, ensure that an outside light is on, or have someone meet you at the gate.  Check with your armed response company if they are rendering rendezvous services.

If at any time you have to open the gate yourself, switch off the vehicle, leave the key in the ignition and close the door.  Then open the gate. 


If you have small children in the vehicle, take the key with you (this is the only exception).  You need the key as a “negotiating tool”.  The perpetrators want your vehicle and you want your children.


If your children are older, it is advised that they exit the vehicle with you when opening the gate so that you are all separated from the vehicle should a hijack occur.

   

 
Have your key ready, but not visible.

Inspect the outside and inside of the vehicle before unlocking. (Tyre, tyre, number plate, other side of the vehicle – as explained during the hijack prevention & survival course)
Know your destination and directions to it; and be alert should you get lost.
Always drive with your windows closed and doors locked.
Make a mental note of any Police Stations in the vicinity.
When stopping behind another vehicle, leave half a vehicle length in front of your vehicle to make an emergency escape if necessary.

When dropping off a passenger, make sure they are safely in their own vehicle before departing.

Avoid driving through high crime or unfamiliar areas.
Avoid driving late at night / early hours of the morning when the roads are quiet.
Drive in the center lane away from pedestrians where possible.

 Parking your vehicle:

 

Check rear-view mirror to ensure you are not being followed.

When exiting your vehicle, be cautious and aware of surrounding obstructions and shrubbery that may be concealing a hijacker.


Never sit in your parked vehicle without being conscious of your surroundings.  Sleeping in a stationary vehicle is particularly dangerous.


When approaching your driveway, be on the lookout for suspicious vehicles / persons.  This is very important as the majority of hijackers approach their victims in home driveways.

Whilst entering your vehicle and while driving, the following should be considered:

   
If possible, never drive alone.

NEVER, EVER pick up hitchhikers or strangers.  (VERY IMPORTANT)


Never follow routine routes when driving; change on a regular basis.

Other situations:

If approached by a stranger while in your vehicle, drive off if possible or use your hooter to attract attention.

Lock your doors, close your windows and do not have bags or briefcases visible in the vehicle.  Use the boot for this.  Cell phone should also not be visible. 


There are times and days that these items are visible in the vehicle.  Try and open the window they might “smash & grab” about 3 cm, so the window can absorb the sudden impact.  If you’ve left your stopping distance you may be able to escape.


Be constantly on the lookout for suspicious looking characters or vehicles and do not hesitate to report them to the SAPS.


Always be on the alert for potential danger, and be on the lookout for possible escape routes and safe refuge along the way. 

   
When approaching a red traffic light at night, slow down so that you only reach it when it turns green.

Do not take anything from people standing at traffic lights or places where they gather (job seekers on gathering points).  Perpetrators are usually standing among these people.


Make sure you are not followed.  If you suspect you are being followed, drive to the nearest Police Station or any busy public area.
 
   
If any person or vehicle in a high-risk area arouses your suspicions, treat it as hostile and take appropriate action, e.g. when approaching a red traffic light, slow down, check for oncoming traffic and if clear, drive through the intersection.  A fine will be preferable to an attack.  Treat stop streets in the same way.  Thereafter call for assistance if necessary.  Always report these incidents to the SAPS.  But remember, this is not an excuse to ignore the rules of the road.  The onus will be on you to prove in a court of law that you had justifiable reason to act the way you did and this is only in the case of a real, life-threatening emergency.    
Should a suspicious vehicle in fact be a (unmarked) SAPS vehicle, the Police must identify themselves by:

Use of a blue light, loudspeaker or any other police equipment.
The flash of a badge through the window whilst driving is not enough. The Police must go all out in order to let the public know who they are.

Consider the following actions:

Switch on emergency lights and put your hand out the window (if possible), indicating that they should follow you.  Your intention must be very clear and understandable.

By exceeding the speed limit, you are sending out a message of suspicion, e.g. stolen / hijacked vehicle, transporting stolen goods, under the influence.

Drive to the nearest Police Station or when in doubt, the nearest busy public area.

Always have your identity document and driver’s license in your possession as well as a pen and notebook to take necessary notes.

If possible, avoid driving in the dark.  Hijackers may stage a minor accident, for e.g. If your vehicle is bumped from behind and you do not feel comfortable with the individual involved in the situation, indicate he / she must follow you and drive to the nearest Police Station or any busy public area for help.

Never open your vehicle window or door for any stranger.  If a suspicious person is near your unoccupied vehicle, do not approach the vehicle.  Walk to the nearest public area and ask for assistance.

   
If you encounter obstacles in the road, e.g. rocks, tyres, do not get out of your vehicle to remove them.  Reverse and drive away in the opposite direction.
Do not stop to eat or rest on deserted roads.
Do not leave your vehicle unattended at a filling station.
Cell phones should be carried on the body.  Perpetrators will not allow you to remove your cell phone and valuables from the vehicle during an attack.
   

 Information you should know:

 

If your vehicle is hijacked or stolen, promptly report it to the SAPS.  Make sure you have the vehicle details:  model, color, vehicle identification and registration numbers available to assist with the recovery of the vehicle.

When forced to drive with a hijacker, be observant without making direct eye contact and try to memorise as many details as possible. 

It is important to describe the hijacker as accurately as possible.  When observing a hijacker, take note of his head and face – the shape of the eyes, mouth, nose and ears.  Take note of possible irregularities.  Look at the hair, skin color, complexion and possible scars and tattoos.  Observe the build, sex, body movement, clothing and any conversation that may take place.

Remember the direction from which they came and fled, as well as the time and place the incident happened.

Remember to make mental and physical notes immediately after the incident to ensure accurate and detailed information for the Police investigation.

   

 Taken hostage 
It can be helpful to have a survival plan in the back of your mind should such an incident occur.  It is difficult not to become paranoid about being taken hostage.  However, it is just as easy to become complacent.

 

One very important fact to remember when being hijacked:
Should the conclusion of the drama be by way of armed intervention, and escape is not possible, immediately drop to the ground, remain still and obey the orders of the leader.
 

   

 
If confronted.
 

Simply place this code on your website, or copy it into an email and send it to your webmaster. Make South Africans aware of all the crime!!! 

 

 
What it will look like on your website 



Report Crime in South Africa HERE
 

Do not lose your temper, threaten or challenge the hijacker. 

 DO EXACTLY AS TOLD BY THE HIJACKERS!

Do not resist, especially if the hijacker has a weapon.  Surrender your vehicle and move away.  Try to put as much distance between yourself and the hijacker(s) as speedily as possible.

Do not reach for your purse or valuables.  Leave everything in the vehicle.

Try to remain calm at all times and do not show signs of aggression.

Be compliant to all demands set by the perpetrator.

Do not make eye contact with the hijacker.  He may perceive this behavior as a threat and retaliate aggressively.

Keep your hands still and visible to the hijacker, so as to give him assurance of your passive content.

Do not speak too fast (if you are able to talk) and do not make sudden movements.

Gather as much information as possible without posing a threat.
How many people?
How many firearms and description thereof?
What were the perpetrators wearing (clothing)?
To which direction did they drive off?
Take note of the language they use (the accent).

First phone the SA Police Service on 08600 10111.  They will dispatch the medical services if needed.  Other emergency numbers you could phone are 112 ANY Network (Vodacom+MTN+Cell C) or 147 Vodacom ONLY.

Activate the vehicle-tracking device, if the vehicle is fitted with one.

 

   

The Effects of Trauma:

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

This is the term given to a particular range and combination of reactions following trauma.  Reactions following trauma can be divided into three main groups:
Re-experiencing the event – a feeling that you are experiencing the original event all over again, through memories intruding into your waking or sleeping life.

Arousal reactions – you feel persistently aroused, nervous, agitated sense, anxious, tense, unable to settle or concentrate, over-reacting very sharply to small things and especially, having trouble sleeping.Avoidance reactions – you make frantic efforts to avoid anything that could remind you of the trauma, or cause you to think or talk about it in any way.  You may shut down your feelings about other people and things you normally care about and keep to yourself.  You may feel unusually withdrawn and emotionally numb.

 

   

Five stages of trauma / loss:

 

Denial
Anger
Bargaining
Depression
Acceptance 

 

The following is some general advice to help you cope with trauma in general and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in particular:

Do: 

Express your emotions.
Talk about what has happened as often as you need to.  Seek trauma counselling.
Try to keep your life as normal as possible by following daily routines.
Find opportunities to review the experience.
Look to friends and colleagues for support.
 
 Don’t:

Use alcohol, nicotine or other drugs to hide your feelings.

Simply stay away from work or isolate yourself.  Seek help and support instead (counselling).

Allow anger and irritability to mask your feelings.

Hide your feelings and be afraid to ask for help.

Think your feelings are a sign of weakness. 
Remember that your life is worth more than your vehicle!

Tell A Friend 

For more information on the Hijack Prevention & Survival Course, please contact:

Richard & Melinda Brussow
Cell:  073 161 2344
Tel:  (012) 661-1388
Fax:  0866 317 527
Email:  nhpa@hijack.co.za
Website:  www.hijack.co.za

   

PROTECTING YOURSELF AGAINST HIJACKINGS

 

Amidst the increase in hijackings in South Africa, it is very important to know some of the following aspects:

  • How do the hijackers operate?
  • When am I most at risk?
  • How do I avoid being hijacked?
  • What do I do when confronted?
   
   -::- HOW TO AVOID A HIJACK SITUATION: -::-

Sterling work has been done by specialists such as Richard and Melinda Rossouw of the National Hijack Prevention Academy [NHPA]. They have a vast experience in avoidance measures and also present driver training modules such as (a) Collision Avoidance/Skidpan and (b) Defensive Driving. They have made available to the public via the website www.hijack.co.za the following information on how to avoid a hijack situation. It is recommended to contact them via this website should you require further info on these and other courses.

   
  • 2km from your house strategy. Be extra alert. Switch off the car radio and concentrate on your surroundings. If you have noticed any vehicle behind you, use the techniques you have learned during the hijack prevention & survival course to determine whether you are being followed.
  •  
  • Remember to stop your vehicle just on the inside of the gate and select reverse whilst waiting for the gate to close. This creates confusion and may buy you a few seconds for the gate to close completely behind you.
  • Check your driveway and street before you leave or enter your premises.
  • Make sure your driveway is well lit and clear from shrubbery where perpetrators can hide.
  • Be aware of unknown pedestrians close to your residential address – do not turn into your driveway – pass and go back later.
  • Liaise with your neighbours – know them.
  • Be aware of vehicles parked close to your address with occupants inside. It might be perpetrators observing the area.
  • Be alert if your animals do not greet you at the gate as usual. It might be that the perpetrators over-powered them.
  • Phone your home and ask for someone to make sure your driveway is safe and to open and close the gate for you.
  • When returning home after dark, ensure that an outside light is on, or have someone meet you at the gate. Check with your armed response company if they are rendering rendezvous services.
  • If at any time you have to open the gate yourself, switch off the vehicle, leave the key in the ignition and close the door. Then open the gate.
  • If you have small children in the vehicle, take the key with you (this is the only exception). You then need the key as a “negotiating tool”. The perpetrators want your vehicle and you want your children.
  • If your children are older, it is advised that they exit the vehicle with you when opening the gate so that you are all separated from the vehicle should a hijack occur.
   
 Parking your vehicle:
  • Check rear-view mirror to ensure you are not being followed.
  • When exiting your vehicle, be cautious and aware of surrounding obstructions and shrubbery that may be concealing a hijacker.
  • Never sit in your parked vehicle without being conscious of your surroundings. Sleeping in a stationary vehicle is particularly dangerous.
  • When approaching your driveway, be on the lookout for suspicious vehicles / persons. This is very important as the majority of hijackers approach their victims in home driveways.
   

Whilst entering your vehicle and while driving, the following should be considered:  

 

  • Have your key ready, but not visible. 
  • Inspect the outside and inside of the vehicle before unlocking. (Tyre, tyre, number plate, other side of the vehicle – as explained during the hijack prevention & survival course)
  • Know your destination and directions to it; and be alert should you get lost.
  • Always drive with your windows closed and doors locked.
  • Make a mental note of any Police Stations in the vicinity.
  • When stopping behind another vehicle, leave half a vehicle length in front of your vehicle to make an emergency escape if necessary.
  • When dropping off a passenger, make sure they are safely in their own vehicle before departing.
  • Avoid driving through high crime or unfamiliar areas.
  • Avoid driving late at night / early hours of the morning when the roads are quiet.
  • Drive in the center lane away from pedestrians where possible.
  • If possible, never drive alone.
  • NEVER, EVER pick up hitchhikers or strangers. (VERY IMPORTANT)
  • Never follow routine routes when driving; change on a regular basis.
   

 
Other situations:

  SAFETY TIPS FOR WOMEN DRIVING ALONE

The risks of driving alone can be exaggerated - be sensible about your safety but don't be afraid to drive on your own.

  • A well-maintained car is less likely to break down - have yours serviced regularly by a reputable garage.
  • Make regular basic checks on the car yourself. This will give you confidence.
  • Keep a coat, sensible shoes, blanket, torch, and phonecard/money in the car.
  • Plan your route if the journey is unfamiliar, and keep to well-lit main roads. Carry a road atlas, and tell someone your route, and what time you expect to arrive.
  • Keep valuables, briefcase, handbag and mobile phone out of sight.
  • In town, lock the car doors and keep the windows and sunroof only partly open.
  • When stopped in traffic, leave enough space to pull out from behind the car you are following.
  • If someone tries to get into your car, attract attention by sounding your horn or a personal alarm.
  • Any motoring assistance company or garage mechanic who is sent to help you will carry a proof of identity. You may ask to see this before unlocking your car.
  • NEVER give lifts to strangers.
  • Beware of anyone who signals that there is something wrong with your car, unless you know that they are right and it is dangerous to drive on.
  • If approached by a stranger while in your vehicle, drive off if possible or use your hooter to attract attention.
  •  
  • Lock your doors, close your windows and do not have bags or briefcases visible in the vehicle. Use the boot for this. Cell phone should also not be visible.
  • There are times and days that these items are visible in the vehicle. Try and open the window they might “smash & grab” about 3 cm, so the window can absorb the sudden impact. If you’ve left your stopping distance you may be able to escape.
  • Be constantly on the lookout for suspicious looking characters or vehicles and do not hesitate to report them to the SAPS.
  • Always be on the alert for potential danger, and be on the lookout for possible escape routes and safe refuge along the way.
  • When approaching a red traffic light at night, slow down so that you only reach it when it turns green.
  • Do not take anything from people standing at traffic lights or places where they gather (job seekers on gathering points). Perpetrators are usually standing among these people.
  • Make sure you are not followed. If you suspect you are being followed, drive to the nearest Police Station or any busy public area.
  • If any person or vehicle in a high-risk area arouses your suspicions, treat it as hostile and take appropriate action, e.g. when approaching a red traffic light, slow down, check for oncoming traffic and if clear, drive through the intersection. A fine will be preferable to an attack. Treat stop streets in the same way. Thereafter call for assistance if necessary. Always report these incidents to the SAPS. But remember, this is not an excuse to ignore the rules of the road. The onus will be on you to prove in a court of law that you had justifiable reason to act the way you did and this is only in the case of a real, life-threatening emergency.
  • Always have your identity document and driver’s license in your possession as well as a pen and notebook to take necessary notes.
  • If possible, avoid driving in the dark. Hijackers may stage a minor accident, for e.g. If your vehicle is bumped from behind and you do not feel comfortable with the individual involved in the situation, indicate he / she must follow you and drive to the nearest Police Station or any busy public area for help.
  • Never open your vehicle window or door for any stranger. If a suspicious person is near your unoccupied vehicle, do not approach the vehicle. Walk to the nearest public area and ask for assistance.
  • If you encounter obstacles in the road, e.g. rocks, tyres, do not get out of your vehicle to remove them. Reverse and drive away in the opposite direction.
  • Do not stop to eat or rest on deserted roads.
  • Do not leave your vehicle unattended at a filling station.
  • Cell phones should be carried on the body. Perpetrators will not allow you to remove your cell phone and valuables from the vehicle.
   
  Information you should know:

If your vehicle is hijacked or stolen, promptly report it to the SAPS. Make sure you have the vehicle details: model, color, vehicle identification and registration numbers available to assist with the recovery of the vehicle.

When forced to drive with a hijacker, be observant without making direct eye contact and try to memorise as many details as possible.

It is important to describe the hijacker as accurately as possible. When observing a hijacker, take note of his head and face – the shape of the eyes, mouth, nose and ears. Take note of possible irregularities. Look at the hair, skin color, complexion and possible scars and tattoos. Observe the build, sex, body movement, clothing and any conversation that may take place.

  • Remember the direction from which they came and fled, as well as the time and place the incident happened.
  • Remember to make mental and physical notes immediately after the incident to ensure accurate and detailed information for the Police investigation.

Taken hostage - It can be helpful to have a survival plan in the back of your mind should such an incident occur. It is difficult not to become paranoid about being taken hostage. However, it is just as easy to become complacent.

One very important fact to remember when being hijacked:

Should the conclusion of the drama be by way of armed intervention, and escape is not possible, immediately drop to the ground, remain still and obey the orders of the leader.

   
  •  
  • Do not lose your temper, threaten or challenge the hijacker.
  •  
  • DO EXACTLY AS TOLD BY THE HIJACKERS!
  • Do not resist, especially if the hijacker has a weapon. Surrender your vehicle and move away. Try to put as much distance between yourself and the hijacker(s) as speedily as possible.
  • Do not reach for your purse or valuables. Leave everything in the vehicle.
  • Try to remain calm at all times and do not show signs of aggression.
  • Be compliant to all demands set by the perpetrator.
  • Do not make eye contact with the hijacker. He may perceive this behavior as a threat and retaliate aggressively.
  • Keep your hands still and visible to the hijacker, so as to give him assurance of your passive content.
  • Do not speak too fast (if you are able to talk) and do not make sudden movements.
  • Gather as much information as possible without posing a threat.
    • How many people?
    • How many firearms and description thereof?
    • What were the perpetrators wearing (clothing)?
    • To which direction did they drive off?
    • Take note of the language they use (the accent).
  • First phone the SA Police Service on 08600 10111. They will dispatch the medical services if needed. Other emergency numbers you could phone are 112 ANY Network (Vodacom+MTN+Cell C) or 147 Vodacom ONLY.
   
  Types of Car Insurance

The vehicle owner needs to be aware of the variety of vehicle cover options. Some of these descriptions are:

  • Comprehensive Cover: covers your vehicle for accidental damage, theft and hijack, as well as injury to other people or damage to their vehicle in an accident
  • Balance of Third Party, Fire and Theft Insurance- provides you with cover for damage to the other party's vehicle in the event of an accident, and for your vehicle in the event of loss by theft, or fire.
  • Balance of third party is the most limited form of cover. It does not cover you for damage to, or the loss of, your own vehicle, but it covers the costs of damage to the other car in an accident you cause
  • Limited Cover: covers your vehicle for damage caused by fire, theft and hijack, as well as injury to other people or damage to their property, Accidental damage to your vehicle is not covered. 
  • Liability to Other People: covers you for liability to other people where an accident caused death or injury to them or damage to their property. 
  • Essential Cover: no frills option for older, lower value vehicles where you choose the combination of and amount of cover that you need.
   

Policies may also include a wide range of options and benefits. Without discussing this in depth we would like to name just a few:

 

  • Bodily injury liability, property damage liability, medical payments coverage, uninsured or under insured motorist coverage, comprehensive coverage etc, are some of the great vehicle insurance benefits available.
  • Medical payments coverage assists in paying medical expenses, even if the insured person is injured in somebody else's vehicle. Uninsured motorist coverage protects against expenses incurred as a result of an accident that is caused by another individual who is either uninsured or who has inadequate coverage. 
  • Other general vehicle insurance benefits are the cars being covered for their retail value, the fact that you will pay a fixed excess and that repairs done are guaranteed for 12 full months. 
  • Another benefit is the provision for extending coverage to others driving your car with your permission. 
  • Twenty four hour emergency roadside assistance as well as cash bonuses for not claiming are more insurance benefits. This and many other less obvious vehicle insurance benefits are included in vehicle policies

My car/ motor vehicle is insured - what now?

It is important to see the purchase of an insurance police not as a once-off transaction! An important bit of advice is to make sure your insurance company monitors the insured value of your vehicle from year to year. Cars tend to lose value and the book value is what the insurance company will pay out in case of a claim, nothing more. If you pay premiums based on the initial purchasing price, but the second hand value is worth less, the discounted value will be paid out. There is therefore no reason why you should insure your car for more that this value.

It is important to note that a comprehensive insurance premium is amongst others, made of an accident portion (major part) and a theft portion. Even though the car does depreciate it should be kept in mind that spare parts and labour generally get more expensive with the unfortunate effect that there might not be an automatic drop in premium year after year.

Best advice is to contact your insurer or broker and consult with them on whether your premium might be adjusted. 

Continue to improve your driving ability and drive with caution. Even though your car insurance is in place – you would rather like to avoid vehicle and bodily damage!

   

For more on Car Insurance view the Car Insurance and Road Safety Blog

In Car parks: back into the space so that you can drive away quickly. Note which floor and area you have parked in, and have your keys ready when you return.
 
It is important for business managers to understand how vehicle tracking technology is best introduced. It is suggested that business owners should explain to drivers why the system is being proposed, how it will work, what it will achieve and what it will and won’t do.  How this is introduced can have a massive impact on its acceptance by the workforce. It should be explained that cases of vehicle theft, unauthorised use and speeding will be detected, but that any penalties will be defined in disciplinary procedures before the system starts. Employees should understand how the system will be used to improve emergency response in the case of accidents and to protect vulnerable lone workers. This should reassure employees and resolve the fears that result in the implementation of new technology.

Benefits of Vehicle Tracking
Vehicle tracking technology has become an important requirement for effective fleet management and improving the safety of company drivers. The benefits of vehicle tracking include:

  • Vehicle tracking systems reduce running costs by specifically targeting those who speed and waste fuel. 
  • Fuel savings also means it softens the blow to the environment
  • It reduces time wasted through vehicle maintenance. In addition, by having a service that ensures your vehicles are regularly serviced means that resale values for the fleet will be higher. It can also help to avoid penalties for issues such as bald tyres and tax as reminders are clear and precise. 
  • Insurance companies often offer discounts to companies who implement a GPS vehicle tracking system. This is not only because it encourages safer driving, but also helps recovery if thefts do occur. 
  • Vehicle tracking systems are popular in consumer vehicles as a theft prevention and retrieval device.
  • When used as a security system, a Vehicle Tracking System may serve as either an addition to or replacement for a traditional car alarm.
  • Productivity of workers can be increased by being able to keep track of lunch hours, exposing unauthorised stops and breaks and by evaluating the overtime requests of workers. 
  • Tracking devices help businesses to become more “customer friendly”. 
  • Drivers now only need a mobile phone with telephony or Internet connection to be inexpensively tracked by and dispatched efficiently to the customer.
  • Business owners can find their most productive employees and use this information to implement further training or even implement a system of bonuses to enhance staff members' work ethic. 
  • Mobile sales professionals can access real-time locations. For example, in unfamiliar areas, they can locate themselves as well as customers and prospects, get driving directions and add nearby last-minute appointments to itineraries. 
  • Vehicle tracking systems will vastly reduce your phone bills as it is no longer a necessity to constantly call employees to find their location. 
  • It provides easy access to answer enquiries rapidly and accurately.
  • Vehicle tracking systems reduce the amount of paperwork that drivers must fill out. By doing this you not only soften the blow of introducing such a system, but also increase the accuracy of your records. 
  • Business owners are more in touch with their business operations and see an increase in efficiency, productivity and accountability in their businesses.
  • While paying the same wages many companies see a significant increase in productivity that often coincides with the installation of the tracking system.
  • This leads to more jobs completed per day, reduced journey times, fuel savings and improved customer satisfaction.
  • Improved health and safety – knowing the location of a workers vehicle can be of significant benefit if that person were to require immediate attention.
   
Vehicle Tracking enhancing road safety

The above benefits of vehicle tracking systems are well known amongst fleet management companies. It is also important for the vehicle owner to be alert to the benefits that vehicle equipment and software can have in protecting the physical safety and the general well being of loved ones:

We would like to reflect on a few of these benefits:

  • In private cars, installing vehicle tracking software makes the concept of owning and running a private car less stressful for the owner.
  • Emergency Assistance - vehicle tracking software will be able to provide accurate information of your car's whereabouts. In an emergency situation, this will enable instant access to receive medical or emergency assistance. 
  • The police or tracking company can follow the signal emitted by the tracking system to locate a stolen vehicle.
  • Car thieves might tend to stay clear of cars displaying a tracking system sticker or those known to have a tracking device.
  • Data to show driving performance monitoring will not only improve driving but also help to optimise the performance of the vehicle.  
  • Reducing the average speed of your vehicles and getting your vehicles to slow down and stay within the speed limits relate directly into reduced fuel consumption and maintenance.
  • This could also lead to fewer accidents and a saving in your monthly running costs. 
  • Insurance companies might provide a lesser premium if shown your vehicles are now driving slower, driving less distances and you are reducing the risk of accidents.
  • The additional benefit of reducing speed is that you may hold on to your license longer and receive fewer traffic fines. 
  • You can reduce your insurance liability, reduce servicing and maintenance costs with more money available for new and safe tyres. 
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There is a wide range of vehicle tracking suppliers available and many might claim to be the best! The truth is there is no ‘best’ vehicle tracking supplier, but there will be a supplier whose vehicle tracking products and services meet your specific requirements, are reliable, well established, and offer good support at the right price.

What factors do you need to consider whilst making a decision on vehicle tracking for your vehicle?

  • Never assume that all vehicle tracking systems are the same and just choose based on price
  • Learn as much as you can about different systems. Research them on the Internet, call the companies and ask for literature. 
  • The vehicle tracking system needs to be able to do what you require of it. Determine how much money you are willing to spend. 
  • Check exactly what you are getting for your money. Check the fixed and variable costs, set up charges, annual software licensing etc. 
  • Qualify and quantify each benefit and prove to yourself and others in your business that there would be a return on each of these benefits and that they are not just a ‘nice to have’.
  • Reliability – The best way for you to establish whether a product is reliable is to speak to existing customers
  • Customer support – technology is never perfect and vehicle tracking is no different. You will have problems with some of your units over time, which is to be expected, but you need to know that you have the support there when needed. 
  • Financial Stability of the Tracking Supplier – there are a rapidly increasing number of tracking companies entering the industry, and almost as many are failing to survive in a very competitive environment. Enquire about your tracking supplier and find out a bit about their history. 
  • Find out if, in addition to the fixed costs, there are additional monthly charges e.g. "Airtime". Monthly charges, in addition to the cost of the system itself, can add up. 
  • Check the coverage of the tracking system. Are there black spots? If there are, where are they? 
    •  
    • Vehicle tracking technology might provide important evidence after an accident
  • What happens to the data if the Vehicle Location Unit installed in the vehicle cannot transmit due to a coverage black spot? (lack of GSM, GPRS, Satellite Communications) Does the unit store the location updates? If so, how many and for how long? 
   
 

It is important to be aware that the technology you acquire today may be quickly overtaken by the technology of tomorrow. Your vehicle tracking partner must be able to provide you with new technology and upgrades!

Car Insurance and Road Safety

 

Background Information to Car & Vehicle Insurance

Motor vehicle insurance has been described as a necessary evil – even if you pay cash for a motor vehicle and you are the most cautious of motorists, you are at great financial risk if you drive an uninsured vehicle.

Having a good insurance policy puts your mind at ease as you drive and this in itself is one of the biggest vehicle insurance benefits – peace of mind that should you be in an accident or have your car stolen, you are covered!

Motor vehicle insurance has become an important business and people are getting more curious about how to safe guard their cars and other vehicles against vehicle accidents, damage and theft. 

In South Africa, vehicle insurance can be quite expensive with insurance policies having strict conditions as a result of the high-risks of criminal activity and unlicensed road usage. In the UK motor vehicle insurance is compulsory and government is pushing through tough legislation to tackle UK drivers who don't insure their cars.

Consumer education continues to be one of the biggest challenges facing the insurance industry, and most of the complaints to the Ombud for Short Term Insurance are from consumers who are not familiar with the financial services industry and insurance products.

The Arrive Alive website will provide some advice to our road users and vehicle owners about car insurance and road safety.

Basics of Vehicle & Car Insurance

Motor vehicle insurance is essentially a contract in which an insurance company assumes financial responsibility for any loss the insured may incur through damage or theft to his/her vehicle. The bottom line is that you must read your policy and the schedule and make sure that you clearly understand the terminology, terms and conditions, and any exclusion clauses.

Golden rules of car insurance are:

 
  • Know the promise you’re buying: When you buy insurance you buy a promise. For years or even decades you may pay your insurer to say: “In certain circumstances that may never arrive, I will give you certain things.” You need to be sure of what these circumstances are and what you will gain from the cover.
  • Keep the promise you are making: When you buy your insurance you give your insurer much personal information such as your habits and the ways you will use the items you are insuring. If the information is wrong, sometimes even a little bit wrong, the insurer’s promise won’t hold up.
  • It is the insurer’s job to pay you what you are due and not more.

It is important to understand why you are paying a specific premium to insure your car. When your car is stolen, damaged or written off in an accident, the insurance provider will pay out an amount based on a variety of values that are determined beforehand.

These factors include:

 
  • The model and make of your vehicle that is insured, the age of the vehicle as well as the condition that it is in, and the replacement value of the vehicle in question. 
  • If your car is damaged, the normal procedure is the insurer will establish whether the quote to repair your car is reasonable and will ensure that all the damage is repaired. Generally, the insurer will write-off your vehicle if the cost of repairing your vehicle exceeds 70 percent of its value. In this case, the insurer will pay out the vehicle's market value or retail value, depending on the terms and conditions of your contract. 
  • Market value, which is what most insurers pay out, is the average of the retail and the trade value. Retail value is the price you pay to buy your vehicle, whether new or second-hand, from a dealer. The trade value is what a second-hand dealer will give you if you trade in your car. 
  • If your insurer pays out market value, the amount will not be enough to replace your car with a new one.

The cost of car insurance premiums

The insurance company takes many factors into account that may affect the risk to the company of having to pay out a claim:

 
  • The more extensive the insurance cover, the more the policy will cost you - this is why comprehensive cover is more expensive than third party insurance.
  • The type of vehicle such as 4x4, sporty car, family car or bakkie will have an influence on the insurance premiums. Some vehicles simply cost more to repair than others while specific vehicles are more at risk of being stolen or hijacked. The safety offered by the vehicle will also play a role. In addition aspects such as airbags may push the premiums a bit higher because of the cost involved in replacing them.
  • The age of the vehicle will have a definite influence. This is because an older vehicle may cost less to replace, but it may be difficult to get parts for the vehicle and in general it will be more at risk of burning out or failing in one or other way. If you get a pre-owned vehicle insist on an AA test certificate to ensure that you can get lower rates.
  • Sporty vehicles will cost a bit more because of the power and speed associated with them. Drivers are more likely to be younger and less responsible than the older family car drivers.
  • Factors affecting the cost of the policy will also include where you live and whether or not you car is kept in a locked garage at night
  • The premium may be reduced if the vehicle is fitted with tracking devices etc
  • Important human factors are the age of the driver, gender, driving experience, driving record, and when the person received a driver’s license. The longer you drive the more experience you gain. For this reason people over 25 get a slight discount on their car insurance premiums. 
  • First-time drivers or drivers with no history on South African roads are penalized by paying higher premiums until they demonstrate that they are safe drivers. Drivers with a good safety record may benefit when they purchase a vehicle insurance policy by receiving lower premiums
  • The vehicle owner must confirm what the policy says about nominated drivers - future claims may be rejected if the insurance company restricted the drivers of that specific vehicle.
  • It generally costs more to insure your car separately (in a "stand-alone" policy) than it does to include it in your household contents insurance policy. 
  • You may qualify for a discounted premium - referred to in the industry as a no-claim bonus - on comprehensive cover if you have a record of not making claims. The longer the period you have not claimed, the greater the discounted premium you can expect to pay.
  • As with all insurance, the person who takes out the insurance must pay an excess, which is the first amount payable of any claim. Even if you were not at fault in an accident, you have to pay the excess.
  • Many insurers allow you to negotiate the amount of the excess, and this also affects the cost of the premiums you pay. The higher the excess, the lower the premiums, and vice versa.

Why do I need Car/ Vehicle Insurance?

The South African vehicle hijackings and road crash statistics provide more than enough evidence to the importance of vehicle insurance. Over the last couple of years the cost of repairs has increased dramatically and there has been a significant increase in the average cost of a claim. An increase in vehicle theft, accidents and rising repair costs force insurance companies to recalculate the risk and cost of insuring our vehicles.

With South Africa's high accident and car theft rate, you cannot afford to drive an uninsured vehicle. According to the South African Insurance Association (SAIA), about 65 percent of South African motorists are not insured. This has far-reaching implications for all road users, whether or not they are insured.

If you are an uninsured driver, you alone are responsible for covering the costs of repairing your car or even buying a new one if it is seriously damaged. You will also bear the legal costs of trying to claim damages from another uninsured driver without the assistance of an insurer.

I need Car Insurance - what do I need to know?

The Ombudsman for Short-Term Insurance in his annual report emphasized the need to educate the public on insurance matters. The Ombudsman for Short-term Insurance in South Africa recovered a record amount of R83.9 million from insurance companies on behalf of complainants in 2007.

A staggering 67 percent of the complaints received in 2007 related to motor vehicles. A large number of complaints arose from a lack of understanding of insurance or a failure to understand the significance of the information given to an insurer when applying for insurance.

There are many insurance companies out there and it can be quite tough deciding which to opt for.  Before getting vehicle insurance, it is necessary for you to get a detailed view of different insurance quotes from more than one insurance company. The car insurance quotes may be different for different companies, so it is your responsibility to carefully look into the insurance quotes and then decide which one is suitable for you and your vehicle.

 
  • Do your research and shop around.  Get at least three comparative quotes. 
  • Don’t make a decision based on the premium only - make sure you know about hidden costs such as additional excesses. 
  • Consider the insurer’s reputation for service, price and claim settlement turnaround times. 
  • Make sure the company you choose is a registered Financial Services Provider. You can verify its registration with the Financial Services Board which regulates all insurance companies. 
  • Take time to discuss the details of your insurance policy with the direct insurer or broker. 
  • Compare apples with apples.  This means, for example, checking if your vehicle is covered for retail or market value and ensuring the excesses are similar.

Make sure you buy insurance from a reputable company- otherwise you may find that your cover is not worth the paper it is written on when you make a claim. Remember that you have a right to make an informed decision – demand all the information you need before signing a policy application!

   

       












        



 
 
 





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